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Peanuts to be subject of program at Vienna Public Library

Cartoonist Charles Schulz will be the subject of a West Virginia History Alive! on Nov. 21 at the Vienna Public Library. The famed and beloved creator of the Peanuts comic strip will be portrayed by James Froemel of Maidsville, W.Va. The program is free, but registration is required. (Photo Provided)

VIENNA — The creator of the beloved Peanuts cartoon strips will be the subject of a History Alive! program in November at the Vienna Public Library.

The library will present “Charles Schulz (1922-2000): A History Alive Program” at 6 p.m. Nov. 21, the birthday of Charles Schulz. The program is free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register or for more information, call the Library at 304-295-7771.

Schulz will be portrayed by James Froemel of Maidsville, W.Va., a portrayer in the West Virginia Humanities Council History Alive! program. Froemel will present a performance about Schulz’ spirit, wit and wisdom.

Froemel is the program coordinator for undergraduate admissions at the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts and a graduate of WVU in acting. He is a two-time winner of the West Virginia Biggest Liar tournament and his writings have been published in “Goldenseal,” a magazine published by the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History.

Schulz, a cartoonist, was the creator of the Peanuts comic strip that featured Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus and all the rest of the gang. He was a veteran of World War II.

Cartoonist Charles Schulz will be the subject of a West Virginia History Alive! on Nov. 21 at the Vienna Public Library. (Photo Provided)

The first Peanuts strip was published in 1950 in seven newspapers. At the time of Schulz’ death in 2000, the cartoon it appearing in 2,600 papers around the world.

Schulz recognized comics were not just a medium for children. His ability to connect with people through a four-panel strip using dry humor, sarcasm, wit and melancholy resulted in an ongoing daily narrative that lasted nearly 50 years. The popularity of his characters worldwide put them in demand for television specials, merchandise, movies, books, theatrical productions and commercials.

NASA named spacecraft in their honor.

Schulz is among character presentations available through the History Alive! program that highlights noteworthy historical figures. Programs include question and answer sessions.

The historical characterizations includes careful researched of writings, speeches and biographies of the characters. Whenever possible, their original words are used.

The program is available to non-profit and for-profit groups. For more information, call the Humanities Council at 304-346-8500 or go to www.wvhumanities.org.

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