Patterson working hard to raise awareness for bowling

PARKERSBURG – Since the age of three, Ryan Patterson has been a bowling savant, because he spent a large amount of time growing up in a bowling alley where he fell in love with the game, and it also helps that his family has deep ties to the sport.

Patterson’s grandfather used to work at Ren-Dor Lanes, better known now as Pike Street Lanes, while his mother grew up bowling and actually bowled non-professionally.

“I was three years old when I really started to fall in love with the game,” said Patterson. “The fact that my grandfather worked in a bowling alley and my mother bowled growing up gives me a wonderful sense of family feeling, you could say.”

A graduate of Parkersburg South, Patterson’s journey took him to McKendree University in Lebanon, Ill., after high school where he joined the school’s bowling team as a freshman and mentioned he was immediately sold on what the university had to offer.

“They sold me on the program,” he explained. “I was one of the best bowlers in the Parkersburg area and the school had never been ranked in the Top 20 in the nation, so even as a freshman, I wanted to try and change that and build their program.”

His opportunity presented itself in dramatic fashion when as a freshman, he got to do something that few athletes get to experience, compete for a national title which his school won against 18 elite team USA bowlers in what he deemed “the greatest tournament of all time.”

Patterson talked about how being a national champion as a freshman took a while to grasp.

“It did take a while to sink in,” he said. “There were 18 team USA players on the team we faced, four of which went on to be in the PBA, so for me to come in as a freshman and help the school win its first national title in probably the greatest tournament of all time, it meant a lot to me and the coaches Bryan O’Keefe, Shauna O’ Keefe and Darus Kaneper.”

As for how his family felt upon learning he was a national champion, the Patriot alum mentioned how grateful he was for their support.

“My family was utterly speechless,” Patterson said. “My grandfather traveled to my tournaments no matter where they were; he’s been to every single one. They’ve been extremely supportive and I am truly blessed in that regard.”

It’s not just bowling the recent Bearcat graduate has excelled in however. He also obtained a degree in sports management, is on staff at several bowling schools and wants to peruse a naster’s degree in communication.

But perhaps his biggest goal he wishes to achieve is getting bowling more recognized not just in West Virginia, but also around the world in hopes of helping others getting the same opportunity he was given.

In fact, he still helps McKendree University do recruiting and he plans to attend the USBC Junior Gold Championship tournament in Indianapolis, which is the biggest youth tournament in the world with over 10,000 participants.

Patterson will also be speaking at the event about his own experiences, hoping that his words will provide other kids to earn a chance similar to his own.

For someone who has nine sanctioned 300 games (he and his grandfather bowl in a league on Monday nights), the recent graduate credited bowling for changing his life, saying he would still work towards getting bowling more recognized and revealed his plans for the rest of 2016.

“Well, I just graduated,” he said. “My plan for 2016 is to compete in a lot of amateur events, but I have to say bowling has changed my life and I couldn’t imagine life without it. I also want to help other kids who want to make bowling a career. There are multiple juniors and sophomores in Parkersburg that have a lot of talent.”

As for if he has any aspirations to one day make a mark in the PBA, Patterson said he plans on registering Jan. 1 to become a professional, having missed the deadline for registration this year..

However at the moment, his focus is not on turning pro, but on the tournament he is currently playing in Morgantown which will finish up today.

“I placed sixth Friday, bowled Saturday and will be bowling again today,” said Patterson. “This is a pretty big tournament and it’s the first time Morgantown has hosted it, so even though sixth is good, I’m hoping I do better score-wise once the tournament is over.”

Patterson working hard to raise awareness for bowling

PARKERSBURG – Since the age of three, Ryan Patterson has been a bowling savant, because he spent a large amount of time growing up in a bowling alley where he fell in love with the game, and it also helps that his family has deep ties to the sport.

Patterson’s grandfather used to work at Ren-Dor Lanes, better known now as Pike Street Lanes, while his mother grew up bowling and actually bowled non-professionally.

“I was three years old when I really started to fall in love with the game,” said Patterson. “The fact that my grandfather worked in a bowling alley and my mother bowled growing up gives me a wonderful sense of family feeling, you could say.”

A graduate of Parkersburg South, Patterson’s journey took him to McKendree University in Lebanon, Ill., after high school where he joined the school’s bowling team as a freshman and mentioned he was immediately sold on what the university had to offer.

“They sold me on the program,” he explained. “I was one of the best bowlers in the Parkersburg area and the school had never been ranked in the Top 20 in the nation, so even as a freshman, I wanted to try and change that and build their program.”

His opportunity presented itself in dramatic fashion when as a freshman, he got to do something that few athletes get to experience, compete for a national title which his school won against 18 elite team USA bowlers in what he deemed “the greatest tournament of all time.”

Patterson talked about how being a national champion as a freshman took a while to grasp.

“It did take a while to sink in,” he said. “There were 18 team USA players on the team we faced, four of which went on to be in the PBA, so for me to come in as a freshman and help the school win its first national title in probably the greatest tournament of all time, it meant a lot to me and the coaches Bryan O’Keefe, Shauna O’ Keefe and Darus Kaneper.”

As for how his family felt upon learning he was a national champion, the Patriot alum mentioned how grateful he was for their support.

“My family was utterly speechless,” Patterson said. “My grandfather traveled to my tournaments no matter where they were; he’s been to every single one. They’ve been extremely supportive and I am truly blessed in that regard.”

It’s not just bowling the recent Bearcat graduate has excelled in however. He also obtained a degree in sports management, is on staff at several bowling schools and wants to peruse a naster’s degree in communication.

But perhaps his biggest goal he wishes to achieve is getting bowling more recognized not just in West Virginia, but also around the world in hopes of helping others getting the same opportunity he was given.

In fact, he still helps McKendree University do recruiting and he plans to attend the USBC Junior Gold Championship tournament in Indianapolis, which is the biggest youth tournament in the world with over 10,000 participants.

Patterson will also be speaking at the event about his own experiences, hoping that his words will provide other kids to earn a chance similar to his own.

For someone who has nine sanctioned 300 games (he and his grandfather bowl in a league on Monday nights), the recent graduate credited bowling for changing his life, saying he would still work towards getting bowling more recognized and revealed his plans for the rest of 2016.

“Well, I just graduated,” he said. “My plan for 2016 is to compete in a lot of amateur events, but I have to say bowling has changed my life and I couldn’t imagine life without it. I also want to help other kids who want to make bowling a career. There are multiple juniors and sophomores in Parkersburg that have a lot of talent.”

As for if he has any aspirations to one day make a mark in the PBA, Patterson said he plans on registering Jan. 1 to become a professional, having missed the deadline for registration this year..

However at the moment, his focus is not on turning pro, but on the tournament he is currently playing in Morgantown which will finish up today.

“I placed sixth Friday, bowled Saturday and will be bowling again today,” said Patterson. “This is a pretty big tournament and it’s the first time Morgantown has hosted it, so even though sixth is good, I’m hoping I do better score-wise once the tournament is over.”