Brazilian pitch proven very costly

Brazilian organizers are dealing with multiple issues at World Cup soccer stadiums. The World Cup matches are due to begin on June 12.

Brazilian league matches were held in the stadiums to test their viability. Organizers reported problems at the venues, including a leaking roof at the Itaquerao and a pitch invasion at the Arena Pantanal.

Major problems resulted in four deaths during the construction of the Itaquerao stadium in San Paulo. A crane crashed into the 500-ton metal structure that in turn cut through the outer walls of the venue knocking two workers to the ground. Two more workers were killed on the ground by falling debris. A person was resting in an isolated area during a break, when a piece of steel fell from a support killing him instantly. On the same day, a truck driver was crushed by a steel support being lifted by a crane on the work site.

Four support contractors died at the Arena Pantanal from electrocution. The incident was caused by a falling electrical line.

The Curitiba stadium has been plagued by worker strikes due to unsafe conditions and financial issues. Local residents have demolished the site countless times to voice their dislike of the upcoming games.

Escalating violence between fan groups has forced officials to rethink their security plans for the World Cup games.

The San Paulo stadium has been dealing with thousands of impoverished Brazilians living illegally near the stadium. They are blaming the arena’s construction for rent increases that drove them out of their homes. They seized a field nestled in close proximity to the stadium to form a tent city. The residents are dealing with wet conditions, insects, dysentery and a lack of food. Their occupation has come to symbolize the income disparity and frustration that the country’s poor feel.

Ranking officials spent millions of dollars on world-class arenas instead of fixing their economic issues or providing affordable housing to the residents.

World class soccer organizations will be traveling to these arenas to play on the international stage, but will pay little attention to the issues in front of them each day. Television companies will show the action on the pitch but not outside the arenas. Millions of dollars will be made during the World Cup, but none will be directly paid to those that lost their lives building the arenas.

Teams should be forced to visualize the heartache Brazilians are coping with each day of their life. They are the ones in need of money, not the cooperate giants footing the bill to build these world-class stadiums.

Teams should boycott in the World Cup due to the impoverished situations in the country. Government officials should use the funds to help those hurting to live.

The United States is a country based on the freedoms for all. Maybe this is the message the American team should voice to the World Cup Federation.

Contact Eddie Thomas at ethomas@newsandsentinel.com

Brazilian pitch proven very costly

Brazilian organizers are dealing with multiple issues at World Cup soccer stadiums. The World Cup matches are due to begin on June 12.

Brazilian league matches were held in the stadiums to test their viability. Organizers reported problems at the venues, including a leaking roof at the Itaquerao and a pitch invasion at the Arena Pantanal.

Major problems resulted in four deaths during the construction of the Itaquerao stadium in San Paulo. A crane crashed into the 500-ton metal structure that in turn cut through the outer walls of the venue knocking two workers to the ground. Two more workers were killed on the ground by falling debris. A person was resting in an isolated area during a break, when a piece of steel fell from a support killing him instantly. On the same day, a truck driver was crushed by a steel support being lifted by a crane on the work site.

Four support contractors died at the Arena Pantanal from electrocution. The incident was caused by a falling electrical line.

The Curitiba stadium has been plagued by worker strikes due to unsafe conditions and financial issues. Local residents have demolished the site countless times to voice their dislike of the upcoming games.

Escalating violence between fan groups has forced officials to rethink their security plans for the World Cup games.

The San Paulo stadium has been dealing with thousands of impoverished Brazilians living illegally near the stadium. They are blaming the arena’s construction for rent increases that drove them out of their homes. They seized a field nestled in close proximity to the stadium to form a tent city. The residents are dealing with wet conditions, insects, dysentery and a lack of food. Their occupation has come to symbolize the income disparity and frustration that the country’s poor feel.

Ranking officials spent millions of dollars on world-class arenas instead of fixing their economic issues or providing affordable housing to the residents.

World class soccer organizations will be traveling to these arenas to play on the international stage, but will pay little attention to the issues in front of them each day. Television companies will show the action on the pitch but not outside the arenas. Millions of dollars will be made during the World Cup, but none will be directly paid to those that lost their lives building the arenas.

Teams should be forced to visualize the heartache Brazilians are coping with each day of their life. They are the ones in need of money, not the cooperate giants footing the bill to build these world-class stadiums.

Teams should boycott in the World Cup due to the impoverished situations in the country. Government officials should use the funds to help those hurting to live.

The United States is a country based on the freedoms for all. Maybe this is the message the American team should voice to the World Cup Federation.

Contact Eddie Thomas at ethomas@newsandsentinel.com