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PHS ‘bad kid fort’ angers parents

Say teacher ignored IEP, humiliated son with Asperger’s

January 8, 2013

PARKERSBURG — Wood County parents are pushing school officials for accountability after they claim their son was humiliated by a teacher....

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(389)

DoTheRightThing

Feb-05-13 10:01 AM

This should not be a debate about Aspergers or sensory diets. This was abusive behavior by a teacher that should not have happened to ANY student. What kind of atmosphere is this school promoting? This was bullying behavior enacted by a TEACHER and condoned by the administration! The principal said she didn't "believe the teacher intended to embarrass the student." Really?! She should sit in the the "Bad Principal Fort".

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hindsight

Jan-10-13 11:04 PM

I heard the teacher was fired.( don't know how true it is ) but in a call to some friends today that said the teacher was fired and if its true. I say great and since another at the school supported this type of treatment they should get whatever punishment the teacher gets.

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Wvugirl35

Jan-10-13 7:15 PM

And I just reread my first post....you're right, it was directed at you as well and I still don't care how rude it sounds.

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Wvugirl35

Jan-10-13 7:07 PM

collects a check from the government every month!

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Wvugirl35

Jan-10-13 7:06 PM

You're asking me if I'm the Message Board Police and yet you're the one accusing someone else of stirring the pot.....funny. (My apologies for failing to type "*insert sarcasm here*" along with my initial question, I figured since the question was worded similar to yours it would've been recognized). As for my statement about keeping ones trap shut that clearly wasn't directed at you since you made no comment about anyones children, so ease back with the indignation. To answer your question yes I absolutely realize how rude it sounds and I don't really care. It's no more "rude" than the people it was directed at that are making comments about "normal" kids vs. kids that have different needs to help them learn not "belonging" in a public school, saying that the parents of those kids are pawning their children off on the school because they don't want to deal with them, and assuming that every parent that has a child with different learning needs

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phsparent

Jan-10-13 6:29 PM

Wow WVUgirl35, are you the message board police? Just because I chose not to get involved in all the "bickering" back and forth if you will go back and reread the comments you will indeed see that I posted the first day this story was released. Honestly, keep my trap shut? Do you realize how rude that sounds? So, you can "jump in a day late and a dollar short" but no one else can? If that isn't the pot calling the kettle black!

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Wvugirl35

Jan-10-13 4:14 PM

phsparent, are you seriously jumping in this thread a day late and dollar short?! I don't normally comment on these threads, I just read through them to get my daily dose of "my opinion matters more than yours" but I must say when it comes to children ("normal" or not) unless you're a parent that has walked in those shoes you should probably keep your trap shut before suggesting someone is just trying to "stir the pot". As for your reference to ad hominem tactics, may I suggest you refer to Harley's multiple posts making personal attacks towards other people? You won't have to look far or long, as there are many! One cannot expect others to refrain from wavering from the topic at hand and resulting to personal pokes when they can't bring themselves to maintain that practice. Just saying.

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phsparent

Jan-10-13 9:56 AM

Mack76, are you seriously still trying to stir the pot? Plagiarism? What does that have to do with the topic? Besides, even though proper credit may not have been given this is a message board not a term paper. Have you ever heard of ad hominem tactics? They really aren't helpful in proving your point. How can you complain about bullying when you are attempting to bully people who disagree with you? As for what your very wise professor said, that goes for "facts" presented by both sides not just the one you disagree with.

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9303qaz

Jan-09-13 8:12 PM

Bigredmarchingband1, thanks for your insight.I don't think it's ok to put a box around a child for any reason!

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Mack76

Jan-09-13 5:07 PM

And as for the "B-Calm Hideaway", I have no doubts about the benefits of a sensory diet in an effort to calm a student and to get him or her to regroup. I'm betting though, that this box doesn't come with a ready-made "Bad Kid Fort" statement on the side, or the effort at humiliating the student using it. Just saying. Apples and oranges.

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Mack76

Jan-09-13 5:06 PM

I was once told by a very wise professor that statistics and reports are only as good and credible as their sources. Facts can be twisted, and numbers can be made to say anything one wants, depending on which side one is representing. That statement has always held a lot of water for me, and continues to do so now.

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Mack76

Jan-09-13 5:04 PM

"Comparatively speaking, the United States does not starve its education system of revenue. The U.S. is one of the leaders in spending on Education, and yet it's schools are rated "average" by international bodies.

The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics.

Worse, out of 34 OECD countries, only 8 have a lower high school graduation rate. The United States' education outcomes most resemble Poland's, a nation that spends less than half on education than the U.S." ~Michael Brendan Dougherty. BusinessInsider**** "If America Spends More Than Most Countries Per Student, Why Are Its Schools So Bad?"

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Mack76

Jan-09-13 5:00 PM

"Mainstreaming will be successful to the extent that both parents and educators are committed to it. If it is forced by legal action, or if a teacher is unwilling or unprepared, it may be worse for a disabled student than better. Successful mainstreaming is a team effort involving teachers, parents, the school principal and specialists such as the speech pathologist and psychologist..."~Raven's Guide to Special Education... for those of you who were wondering...

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Mack76

Jan-09-13 4:58 PM

I love it when people copy and paste information up here to pass it off like it's their own, without even so much as giving the original author credit for the dialogue. Where I come from, that's called "plagiarism" and is evidence of not being able to form one's own original intelligent thought. How sad.

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bigredmarchingband1

Jan-09-13 2:34 PM

9303qaz, congratulations on knowing this teacher/coach, but you can only speculate on this matter for those whose thoughts and opinions actually matter are ones that are currently involved with this woman's teachings and i would hope that you open your mind to others that actually know what they're talking about instead of thinking you obtain the absolute right viewpoint

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Harleyrider

Jan-09-13 1:58 PM

The great news is that the effects of a sensory diet are usually immediate AND cumulative. Activities that perk up your child or calm him down are not only effective in the moment; they actually help to restructure your child’s nervous system over time so that he is better able to: •tolerate sensations and situations he finds challenging •regulate his alertness and increase attention span •limit sensory seeking and sensory avoiding behaviors •handle transitions with less stress

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Harleyrider

Jan-09-13 1:58 PM

Hmmm a quick search shows that placing a child in a box may in fact be appropriate. "Compartmentalizing a student in the classroom may be an appropriate way to help a child susceptible to sensory overload, said Mark Dennis, spokesman for the Elsinore school district.

"It's called a sensory diet, and there are many varieties of adaptations to create a calm environment. A box can be used. A desk with a blanket. A tent. These can all be used inside a classroom," Dennis said, adding that at least one teacher supply catalogue carries a product called the B-Calm Hideaway, a small box-like play area."

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9303qaz

Jan-09-13 1:18 PM

Softballgirl17, I'm sorry to inform you I do know her and I have experienced her bad behavior numerous times. You may like her but, her behavior on and off the field is not exceptable!

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Softballgirl17

Jan-09-13 12:35 PM

9303qaz, I am a player of hers and she isnt a bad coach, so you shouldnt judge her coaching, odds are you probably haven't seen the way she coaches.

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9303qaz

Jan-09-13 11:04 AM

Cjfox3, thank you for your great explanation! Shame on all of you who are blaming any person other than the teacher for her bad behavior. The only people who think segregation is the answer are the uneducated. She is not a good teacher and she is not a good coach!

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cjfox3

Jan-09-13 10:24 AM

I've been seeing numerous posts and comments about how mainstreaming causes way too many problems and Martin School needs to be segregated again for children with disabilities. In 1970- 1 in a 1,000 children were diagnosed with autism now 1 in 88. In 2009 it was 1 in a 110. That is just autism, there are several other different disabilities, there is also ADD, ADHD, the kids who have profound hearing loss, the kids who have physical disabilities without cognitive disabilities, there's the kids who wear glasses, the kids who have wealthy families, the kids whose families live in poverty, the kids who are short, the kids who are tall, the kids who come from different ethnic backgrounds, the list goes on and on. Where do we draw the line with segration? It's been done, it doesn't work. If you think seclusion is the answer than feel free to home school your child or chose a private school. Public schools are for the public, not for the privelaged part of the public, or the "PERFECT&q

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Harleyrider

Jan-09-13 1:37 AM

Mainstreaming will be successful to the extent that both parents and educators are committed to it. If it is forced by legal action, or if a teacher is unwilling or unprepared, it may be worse for a disabled student than better. Successful mainstreaming is a team effort involving teachers, parents, the school principal and specialists such as the speech pathologist and psychologist. Regular classroom teachers are perhaps the most important part of this team. For mainstreaming to work, these teachers must become knowledgeable about students with disabilities. They also must be provided additional resources such as regular in-service training, lower class sizes, and help from special education specialists.

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Harleyrider

Jan-09-13 1:22 AM

The United States places 17th in the developed world for education, according to a global report by education firm Pearson. Comparatively speaking, the United States does not starve its education system of revenue. The U.S. is one of the leaders in spending on Education, and yet it's schools are rated "average" by international bodies. The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics. Worse, out of 34 OECD countries, only 8 have a lower high school graduation rate. The United States' education outcomes most resemble Poland's, a nation that spends less than half on education than the U.S.

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Harleyrider

Jan-09-13 1:18 AM

9303qaz, we are ranked average. South Korea has a better education system than us. Medical care, lol wait a few years and tell me how great it is.

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9303qaz

Jan-09-13 1:05 AM

That's why we have good medical care, good education, live in reasonable society, and we live in the greatest country. Yeah, that's a real bad example lol!

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