Ridiculous right, laughable left

Many Americans say that abortion is wrong. We must protect the unborn. As a society, we have no right to kill a human being without due process. They insist that an unborn baby is a human being and must be protected until born.

Yet, these same people say that the poor are not entitled to universal health care, adequate nutrition, etc. Aren’t these two political, moral values contradictory? In essence, these people say that the utmost protection must be afforded to those who have yet to be born, but that same protection must be withheld from those who have already been born. Is a child really more valuable before birth than after?

Other Americans say that abortion is right. We must protect the rights of the mother. As a society, we have no business telling a woman what she can or cannot do with her own body. They insist that an unborn baby is not a human being at all, but only a “fetus.”

Yet, these same people say that the poor are entitled to universal healthcare, adequate nutrition, etc. Aren’t these two political, moral values contradictory? In essence, these people say that the utmost protection must be afforded to those who have already been born, but that same protection must be withheld from those who have yet to be born. Is a child really more valuable after birth than before?

The political right is farcical, and the political left is laughable. In my view, both positions are ludicrous. Only two logical positions can be held on this question. The first logical position says that, as a country, we must provide zero protection and care for the unborn and for the already-born. The second logical position says that, as a country, we must provide all protection and care for the unborn and the already-born.

Logically, we must be either pro-life with regard to the unborn and the already-born, or we must be pro-choice with regard to the unborn and the already-born. Do you see anyone on the American political landscape holding either one of the logical positions?

This analysis, which has been attributed to Mark Twain, is so spot-on: “Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it.” Mark Twain’s wonder then is, sadly, our wonder now.

Jef Stemple

Vienna