Photo Gallery: Views of the solar eclipse

The moon takes a bite out of the sun during the eclipse Monday in Parkersburg while being framed by the cross on top of the Trinity Hall on Fifth Street. The path of totality spanned across the U.S. with the area of totality several hundred miles south of Parkersburg. (Photo by Art Smith)
Viewing the eclipse City Editor Jesse Mancini uses his homemade pinhole viewer to watch Monday’s solar eclipse from the parking lot of The Parkersburg News and Sentinel. Contraptions ranging from the disposable eclipse glasses available for sale to a pair of welding glasses taped to a cardboard box were passed around at workplaces and schools across Parkersburg, especially as the visible crescent of the sun reached its narrowest point at approximately 2:34 p.m. (Photo by Christina Myer)
Monday’s solar eclipse, as seen through a filtered telescope at Parkersburg South High School. Students and teachers had the opportunity to watch the celestial event using special eclipse-viewing glasses. (Photo provided by Jaime Kupfner)
Corey Kral of Parkersburg looks at the solar eclipse near Eighth and Market streets on Monday. (Photo by Terry L. Estep)

PARKERSBURG — The moon took a bite out of the sun during the eclipse Monday in Parkersburg. The path of totality spanned across the U.S. with the area of totality several hundred miles south of Parkersburg. Contraptions ranging from the disposable eclipse glasses available for sale to a pair of welding glasses taped to a cardboard box were passed around at workplaces and schools across Parkersburg, especially as the visible crescent of the sun reached its narrowest point at approximately 2:34 p.m.

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