West Virginia Music Hall of Fame names inductees

CHARLESTON – The West Virginia Music Hall of Fame has announced the inductees for 2013.

The living inductees are Melvin and Ray Goins, Peter Marshall, Wayne Moss and Tim O’Brien. The deceased inductees are Ada “Bricktop” Smith, Eleanor Steber and the Swan Silvertones.

The 2013 Spirit Award will be presented to Landau Eugene Murphy Jr.

An induction ceremony will be held Nov. 16 at the Culture Center Theater.

All living inductees will be present to accept their awards and perform.

“The class of 2013 inductees continues the Hall of Fame’s mission to recognize outstanding artists who were born or raised in the Mountain State,” said Michael Lipton, Director of the Hall of Fame. “The fifth class honors seven more unique West Virginia artists who have made lasting contributions to American music.”

Melvin Goins and Ray Goins (1936-2007) were born on Sinai Mountain near the coal mining community of Goodwill, Mercer County. They hold a significant place in the history of bluegrass music.

Peter Marshall, born in 1926 in Wheeling as Pierre LaCock, is best-known as the host of more than 5,000 episodes of the five-time Emmy Award-winning game show, “Hollywood Squares.” He is a gifted actor, singer and entertainer.

Wayne Moss was born in 1938 in South Charleston. He was an accomplished bassist, guitarist and songwriter and his credits include sessions for hundreds of country and rock artists, including Simon & Garfunkle, Nancy Sinatra, Charlie Daniels, Joan Baez and Michael Nesmith.

Moss played the signature guitar line on Roy Orbison’s No. 1 hit “Oh, Pretty Woman,” the often-imitated guitar solo on Waylon Jennings’s “Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line,” and on Tommy Roe’s No. 1 million seller “Sheila.”

Tim O’Brien was born in 1954 in Wheeling and is a Grammy-winning bluegrass/country/folk artist.

Ada “Bricktop” Smith, 1894-1984, was born Ada Beatrice Queen Victoria Louise Virginia Smith in Alderson. She was a dancer, singer, Vaudevillian and saloon-keeper who owned the Paris nightclub Chez Bricktop.

After working as a chorus girl in Chicago and Harlem, Bricktop moved to Paris around 1924 to escape the racial tension in the U.S. Cole Porter hired her to entertain at his parties. His song, “Miss Otis Regrets,” was written for her. She was friends with the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, F. Scott Fitzgerald and John Steinbeck.

Eleanor Steber, 1914-1990, is from Wheeling and is considered among the most important U.S. sopranos of the 20th Century.

The Swan Silvertones, formed in 1938, was among the greatest gospel quartets of the ’50s and ’60s. The group, originally called The Four Harmony Kings, and then the Silvertone Singers, was founded in 1938 by Claude Jeter, an Alabama native who moved to McDowell county to work in the mines.