Wilson exhibiting artwork at Parkersburg WesBanco

Photo Provided The Janet (Shila) Wilson exhibit will be on display through June at WesBanco Bank, 415 Market St., Parkersburg, during regular business hours of Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

PARKERSBURG — The Janet (Shila) Wilson exhibit will be on display through June at WesBanco Bank, 415 Market St., in downtown Parkersburg.

The exhibit can be viewed during regular business hours of Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Spending her childhood in rural Ohio afforded Wilson the opportunity to spend much time in the fields and woods experiencing the beauty and mysteries of nature. That continues to inspire and inform her work today. The mediums she employs are photography, printmaking, encaustic, and mixed media.

Wilson studied at the Art Students League in New York City and took classes in printmaking and photography at Marietta College, as well as taking various classes and workshops mostly involving alternative photographic processes and encaustic at the Center for Photography at Woodstock and individual teachers.

“I find joy in nature and the endless discoveries it provides. I love being connected to the web of life through the natural world. Photography is a way for me to share that experience with others. My camera allows me to freeze a moment in time. That moment can be surprising, humorous, uplifting, awe-inspiring, profound or mundane,” said Wilson.

Her work has been exhibited in many group shows at the Parkersburg Art Center, where she placed first in digital photography and third place in theme. She has also been in group shows at the Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park Museum, the Artlink National Print Exhibition, and local artist shows. Private exhibitions have been at Washington State Community College, Cleveland at the School of Natural Healing and WesBanco.

The images on display during June at WesBanco are printed on cotton rag paper, fixed to cradled wooden panels, and have several applications of cold wax medium. This allows the images to stand on their own without being separated by glass or adorned by frames. Wilson enjoys the process of working with the images in this way.

“The captured image provides a moment of stillness and meditation on that particular form and allows a deepening of appreciation to occur. This stillness and deepening is a natural antidote to the stress, tensions, and fast paced life as we know it in the 21st Century,” she said.

COMMENTS