First Settlement Physical Therapy construction continues in Belpre

Photo by Brett Dunlap
Work is ahead of schedule on the new Belpre Medical Center at 2434 Richmiller Road near the Farson Street-Ohio 7 stoplight. Crews have gotten the building’s frame up as well as many of the walls. The building is on track to open in October. The building will be the new home for First Settlement Physical Therapy and First Settlement Orthopaedics in Belpre.

Photo by Brett Dunlap Work is ahead of schedule on the new Belpre Medical Center at 2434 Richmiller Road near the Farson Street-Ohio 7 stoplight. Crews have gotten the building’s frame up as well as many of the walls. The building is on track to open in October. The building will be the new home for First Settlement Physical Therapy and First Settlement Orthopaedics in Belpre.

BELPRE — The construction of the new home for First Settlement Physical Therapy and First Settlement Orthopaedics is moving ahead quicker than first anticipated and is still on track for a fall opening.

Crews with DDC Construction have been working since early spring at the site of the new Belpre Medical Center at 2434 Richmiller Road near the Farson Street-Ohio 7 stoplight. Crews have gotten the building’s frame up as well as many of the walls.

“The good news for us is that despite all the recent rain, we are ahead of schedule,” said Josh Lemley, Marketing Director for First Settlement Physical Therapy.

“It is much further along than we expected. Everything is going well on that. We should be ready to open in October.”

The Belpre Medical Center will be a brand new multi-million dollar, 33,000-square-foot medical complex that will be bringing same day specialty care services to the Mid-Ohio Valley.

The center will provide access to multiple medical specialties including orthopaedics, spinal care, mental health and physical therapy.

The building is expected to employ around 75 employees from the Mid-Ohio Valley, including orthopedic surgeons, spinal surgeons, mental health professionals, family practice physicians, nurses, X-Ray technicians, physical therapists and office staff.

Hopewell Health Services have already committed to the facility to provide mental health services.

They are expecting some of the providers to make their announcements in August that they will be locating to the facility, Lemley said.

“To be able to bring new services to the area that are also independent and patient focused we are trying to bring some of the costs of health care down,” he said. “We want to lead in that.

“We want to do right by patients and do right by the community. Hopefully, more will follow.”

First Settlement Physical Therapy will continue its aquatic therapy programs at the new location, just like they have at all their 18 locations throughout the region. Work is underway to create an inground pool facility inside the new building.

“For us getting people into the water, especially the older population, is important,” Lemley said. “We won’t have a clinic without that option.

“We believe in being able to treat the older population and take a little bit of that pressure off their joints.”

One of the goals of the new facility is to bring health care back to a more personal level.

“As health care has gotten larger and larger over the years and trying to bring it back to a more personal level is never a bad thing,” Lemley said.

Both First Settlement Physical Therapy and First Settlement Orthopaedics have grown due to positive word-of-mouth.

As patients can be with them 4-6 weeks or so, people have been able to judge their services and recommend them to other people.

“That is one of the reasons we have been able to expand,” Lemley said. “We want to make sure that continues in the area by continuing to provide that service.”

The new complex is located across the highway from its current location adjacent to the Belpre Medical Campus of Memorial Health System.

They have to be out of the old building by Oct. 31.

“The nice thing about that is we will be able to close down Friday evening and open up across the street on Monday,” Lemley said. “There won’t be any interruption in care and that will be for all services.”

That location, which is one of the oldest-at 15 years- of the 18 facilities they operate, will be torn down after Oct. 31.

“It was a great home for 15 years,” Lemley said. “We are looking to build one here for a lot longer.”

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