BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Accounting firm renovates Marietta building

Photo by Peyton Neely
Employees of Perry & Associates, Certified Public Accountants enter their new location at 313 Second St. in Marietta Thursday afternoon.

Photo by Peyton Neely Employees of Perry & Associates, Certified Public Accountants enter their new location at 313 Second St. in Marietta Thursday afternoon.

MARIETTA — An accounting firm has renovated and relocated to a more-than-century-old building in Marietta.

Perry & Associates Certified Public Accountants has moved from 428 Second St. to 313 Second St. where it has spent the last year restoring.

It was a $2 million project with the aim to keep as much of the building as authentic as possible, according to Scott Woods, director of business.

“These are the original floors and ceilings from the beginning,” Woods said. “We wanted to keep our business in Marietta and that’s when we found this building.”

The building was first owned by George C. Wilderman, who owned and operated a Ford dealership. It was the first Ford dealership in Marietta and opened when Henry Ford introduced the assembly line in manufacturing the cars.

Photo Provided
The building at 313 Second St. originally was a Ford dealership in the early 1900s.

Photo Provided The building at 313 Second St. originally was a Ford dealership in the early 1900s.

Perry & Associates worked with the Ohio Historical Society and received grants through the Ohio Historical Preservation Tax Credit.

The Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program is partnered with the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office, which determines if a property qualifies as a historic building.

The original building was a two-story, flat roofed, brick building. It had floor-to-ceiling glass windows allowing cars to be displayed in and out.

Offices are now in the upper floors with 32 work stations for employees. The downstairs still holds the original open floor plan with the receptionist desk being the center of the floor.

New windows were installed in the front of the building allowing people driving by to see the front desk, keeping the openness of the first floor.

“We did a lot of work to bring the building history back,” said Woods. “We would submit plans to the Ohio Historic Preservation Office. They would evaluate every aspect of the building and give us recommendations. We officially got verbal approval to begin construction in August.”

Jodey Altier, president and managing partner of Perry & Associates, said she is excited to be able to support the history of the building while providing economic growth for Marietta.

“We actually surveyed all of our employees who are actually in their mid-to-late 20s,” she said. “It was unanimous that everyone wanted to be downtown and stay in our founding city.”

According to the Marietta Water Department, the Third Street building has been vacant since Rite-Aid Pharmacy changed locations in 2000. Prior to that, Beagle Discount Pharmacy was in the building.

“We did a complete build out. The hardest project was finding windows almost identical to the original ones on the front of the building,” said Woods. “There is so much more space for growth in our business and we hope to expand by 15 or so people within the next few years.”

Perry & Associates employs 34 people.

The company was leasing at 428 Second St. The new building cost $475,000.

A grand opening will be held on Feb. 14.”

Brett Burns, auditor for Perry & Associates, said he’s proud of the history behind downtown Marietta and looks forward to working in the middle of it.

“Marietta is all about the history,” he said. “The downtown atmosphere makes you forget you’re just in Marietta because of the big city feeling.”

Mayor Joe Matthews said he was a friend of the founder of the company, Randall Perry.

“I am thrilled to see them move closer and it’s a nice addition to downtown,” he said. “Anytime we can get a new business in Marietta, I’m happy to help out. New businesses mean more city taxes being paid and everybody’s just better. I am really excited to see they managed to preserve the history of the building while boosting local economy.”

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