CCMC receives honor

CHARLESTON – Camden Clark Medical Center was honored with 13 other hospitals across the state for improving outcomes for mothers and babies.

During the 2013 Perinatal Summit in Charleston, 14 hospitals were honored by the West Virginia Perinatal Partnership for their staffs’ efforts to make changes to improve outcomes for mothers and their babies.

Awards were presented to the hospitals whose staffs had made the greatest progress in helping to achieve key initiatives of the partnership.

The awards were presented by first lady Joanne Jaeger Tomblin and leaders of the partnership at a reception hosted by the first lady at the Governor’s Mansion on Nov. 7.

Awards presented during the summit honored hospitals that have achieved major accomplishments under these two initiatives of the partnership.

Camden Clark was honored in the category of “Reduction in Inductions Less Than 39 Weeks Gestation and Less Than 41 Weeks Gestation for First-Time Mothers, 2008-2012.” It was honored along with Wheeling Hospital, United Hospital Center, Bluefield Regional Medical Center and Cabell Huntington Hospital.

“Our goal at CCMC is to keep our less than 39-week elective delivery rate below 5 percent,” said Martha Dawson, director of Women and Children’s Department. “This is monitored monthly, and in October 2013, our rate was 4.6 percent.”

Dawson attributes the award to the collaborative effort among the physicians, nursing staff and quality department.

“Our goal is to continue to sustain our progress in order to improve outcomes for our mothers and babies,” she said.

In 2009, the partnership started an Obstetrical Quality Initiative to reduce West Virginia’s high rates of non-medically necessary labor inductions prior to 39 weeks gestation. Within that year, the members of the partnership were able to reduce the rate by 80 percent, and the rate continues to drop.

In 2010, the Partnership began its second Statewide Quality Initiative, the First Baby Initiative. The goal of this initiative was to reduce West Virginia’s high rates of primary C-sections. To achieve this goal, 23 hospitals began an effort to reduce non-medically necessary labor inductions prior to 41 weeks gestation for first-time mothers.

“It is important to reduce these procedures because they are unnecessary, more costly, and result in babies being born too early and sent to Neonatal Intensive Care Units,” Amy Tolliver, director of the Partnership said. “More importantly, these non-medically indicated labor inductions do not improve outcomes for mothers or babies.”

Additionally, awards were presented jointly by the Partnership and the West Virginia Breastfeeding Alliance to hospitals and birthing facilities who are taking steps to better support and encourage mothers to breastfeed their babies.

“It sends a mixed message when doctors and nurses tell mothers the best step they can do for their baby is to breastfeed and then they hand them a take home bag with formula samples and coupons,” said Cinny Kittle, director of the West Virginia Breastfeeding Alliance. “Many people feel that hospitals have been used as marketers of infant formula, which is a detriment to mothers and babies successfully breastfeeding. Breast milk offers the optimum nutrition for babies and breastfeeding offers health benefits for the mother as well as the baby.”

Mrs. Tomblin said she was proud to be able to participate in such an important event and to recognize people’s efforts to assure the babies of West Virginia are on the right track to a safe and successful future.

“I was so impressed to learn that the summit programs focused on not only improving the health of babies after they are born, but also on helping mothers prevent future problems before they begin,” she said.

Additionally, awards were presented jointly by the Partnership and the West Virginia Breastfeeding Alliance to hospitals and birthing facilities who are taking steps to better support and encourage mothers to breastfeed their babies.

“It sends a mixed message when doctors and nurses tell mothers the best step they can do for their baby is to breastfeed and then they hand them a take home bag with formula samples and coupons,” said Cinny Kittle, director of the West Virginia Breastfeeding Alliance. “Many people feel that hospitals have been used as marketers of infant formula, which is a detriment to mothers and babies successfully breastfeeding. Breast milk offers the optimum nutrition for babies and breastfeeding offers health benefits for the mother as well as the baby.”

The specific award categories and their recipients presented at the Summit were as follows:

  • “Reduction in Non-Medically Necessary Labor Inductions for First-Time Mothers, Less Than 41 Weeks Gestation, By 13 Percent or Greater, 2008-2012” were presented to Pleasant Valley Hospital, Logan Regional Medical Center, Greenbrier Valley Medical Center and Summersville Regional Medical Center.

* “Reduction in Non-Medically Necessary Labor Inductions Less Than 39 Weeks Gestation, By 20 percent or Greater, 2008-2012” was presented to Thomas Memorial Hospital.

* “First Baby Initiative Award for Having a Five Percent or Greater Reduction in Primary C-section Rates Among First-Time Mothers, 2009 – 2012” were presented to Thomas Memorial Hospital, Berkeley Medical Center and WVU Hospitals.

* “Hospitals Maintaining a Low C-section Rate Averaging 10 Percent or Lower, 2009-2012” were presented to Berkeley Medical Center, Greenbrier Valley Medical Center and St. Joseph’s Hospital (Buckhannon).

* “Hospitals and birthing centers that work to support and encourage women in breastfeeding by ‘Banning the Bag’ of infant formula traditionally given to mothers” were presented to Berkeley Medical Center, St. Joseph’s Hospital (Buckhannon) and FamilyCare Women’s Health and Birth Center.